Fri. Jul 1st, 2022

Strawberry farming has a high profit potential and can quickly transform you from a job seeker to a job creator or an employee to an employer in less than a year. Would you like to learn how to do it?

Strawberries may be grown in practically any section of the country as long as there is a consistent supply of water and a temperature range of 10 to 30 degrees Celsius.

Step 1: Getting Started

You’ll need some acreage to plant your strawberry crop, of course. For a novice, 1/8th of an acre would enough, but if you live in the city, you can start farming with a few containers.

Begin looking for seedlings once you’ve obtained a suitable piece of land in an area with appropriate water supply. The finest type to choose is “Chandelier Strawberry,” which grows well in Kenya’s climate.

For a 1/8th acre of land, you’ll need roughly 3,000 seedlings. Given that each seedling costs Ksh10, your initial seed investment will be approximately Ksh30,000.

You’ll need an extra Ksh15,000 for transportation, fertilizer, and agro-chemicals on top of the cost of seeds.

Step 2: Prepare The Land

After that, soften the soil by tilling it, removing weeds, and so on. Later on, add some manure and ash to ensure that your crop receives a sufficient amount of nutrients.

Plant your strawberry seedlings, leaving a 30-centimeter gap between rows. 

Read More On: Goose Berry, Ground Cherry, Golden Berry Farming in Kenya. Business Tips and Market Guide.

Step 3: Look For Market Early Enough

The crop matures and produces the first fruits in about 70 days. However, because the fruits are highly perishable,  it is advisable to begin looking for a market as soon as possible to avoid losses.

Demand is plentiful in major urban marketplaces, particularly among green-grocery vendors. Clientele to companies like Brookside, Trufood, KCC, and major supermarket chains to reach a larger market. In that situation, you’ll need to invest in quality packaging and obtain certification from the Kenya Bureau of Standards.

Step 4: Harvesting and Selling Your Produce

At the present market price, a 1/8th acre of land may produce between 30kg and 50kg of strawberries per week, with each kilo costing around Ksh200. If your tiny farm produces 50 kilograms per week, you can earn Ksh40,000 per month by employing only a small amount of your land.

Furthermore, you can boost your farm’s output by investing in aquaponics, which can treble your farm’s productivity and allow you to earn at least Ksh100,000 per month on just 1/8th of an acre.

Within 6 months of establishing the farm, you can recover your initial investment.

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